interactive_brain_detail1

Learn the Lobes of the Brain

Post type: Interactive Media

This interactive illustration is designed to teach the lobes of the human brain in sagittal section. Students can test themselves by hovering over the brain to reveal the labels one at a time.

The interactivity was created using only the CSS hover feature. For a more detailed description of creating an illustration like this, read this tutorial written by illustrator Memori Otsuka.

Open the interactive illustration.

ellis_jerusha_ROM

The Case of Ann Jolie

Post type: Interactive Media

orientation_figures_detail1 orientation_figures_detail2

The Case of Ann Jolie is a medical legal slide presentation that is intended to help medical experts clearly communicate complex injuries to a jury, judge and other trial participants. It uses interactive transparency sliders to allow the medical experts to demonstrate the accuracy of the illustrations in clarifying radiographic images of the plantiffs injuries. The presentation was created as part of a team of five students in the Masters of Science in Biomedical Communications (MScBMC) program, at the University of Toronto consisting of myself, Melissa Cory, Joy Qu, Inessa Stanishevskaya, and Erin Warkentin.

This presentation won the 2012 Artery Studios Award, given by the Biomedical Communications Program, Institute for Medical Science, University of Toronto. One prize is awarded each year for excellence in the visualization of demonstrative evidence.

The interactive presentation can be viewed below:

You must have Flash to view this file
ellis_jerusha_SmokingCessation_Disease

Diseases Related to Smoking

Post type: Illustration

This illustration is designed to educate patients about the wide range of diseases and cancers that are associated with chronic smoking. It doesn’t give any detail about specific diseases but illustrates how smoking related disease can effect many different parts of your body.

This illustration is part of the iMD Health library of images. This illustration would be used by a doctor or pharmacist as a visual aid to explain the risks of smoking related disease to a patient considering a smoking cessation treatment program.

Print

Osteoarthritis of the Elbow

Post type: Illustration
osteoarthritis_detail1

Slide showing illustration in context

This illustration communicates the location of damaged articular cartilage in osteoarthritis. This image is part of a medical legal presentaion that is intended to help medical experts clearly communicate complex injuries to a jury, judge and other trial participants. The presentation was created as part of a team of five students in the Masters of Science in Biomedical Communications (MScBMC) program, at the University of Toronto consisting of myself, Melissa Cory, Joy Qu, Inessa Stanishevskaya, and Erin Warkentin. We worked with McLeish Orlando Critical Injury Lawyers to ensure that the presentation met industry standards for demonstrative evidence.

This presentation won the Artery Studios award for excellence in demonstrative evidence.

The interactive presentation can be viewed below:

You must have Flash to view this file
ellis_jerusha_TorontoNotes

Toronto Notes

Post type: Illustration

These illustrations are published in Toronto Notes 2013-2014. Toronto Notes is a study guide used by medical students studying for their medical licensing exam across Canada and around the world. It is edited by medical students at the University of Toronto. These illustrations were intended to communicate a concept quickly to students that are studying a large volume of information

ellis_jerusha_lagscrewfixation

Lag-screw Fixation of a Middle Phalanx Fracture

Post type: Illustration

lagscrew_detail2
lagscrew_detail1

This illustration is intended to teach medical students the lag-screw fixation technique and show the final screw placement for a specific spiral fracture of the middle phalanx. This illustration was developed from surgical observation of hand surgeon Dr. Paul Binhamer at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto. Continue reading

ellis_jerusha_lactation

Neuroendocrinology of Lactation

Post type: Illustration
lactation_detail1

detail of the pituitary gland

lactation_detail2

detail of the mammary gland

This illustration is intended to communicate the neural and endocrine pathways of the milk ejection reflex in humans. The illustration differentiates between the anatomy of the adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis and how they stimulate the productions of the hormones necessary for milk production and ejection.

This illustration is a mock up for a full page textbook layout in a chapter on Neuroanatomy or Endocrinology.

ellis_jerusha_lateralepicondyle

Common Extensor Tendon Anatomy

Post type: Illustration

This illustration shows the anatomy of the extensors muscles of the hand and how they originate at the common tendon of the lateral epicondyle of the humerus. This illustration accompanied a larger illustration describing Lateral Epicondylitis, a repetitive strain injury in which this common extensor tendon become damaged.

ellis_jerusha_orientation_figures

Orientation Figures

Post type: Illustration
orientation_figures_detail2

Slide page showing the orientation figure in context

X-ray imaging can be disorienting to an untrained audience. These illustrations are meant to orient a jury to the location of the plaintiff’s injuries when they are being presented with medical imaging evidence.

These orientation images are part of a medical legal interactive slide presentation that is intended to help medical experts clearly communicate complex injuries to a jury, judge and other trial participants. The presentation was created as part of a team of five students in the Masters of Science in Biomedical Communications (MScBMC) program, at the University of Toronto consisting of myself, Melissa Cory, Joy Qu, Inessa Stanishevskaya, and Erin Warkentin. We worked with McLeish Orlando Critical Injury Lawyers to ensure that the presentation met industry standards for demonstrative evidence.

This presentation won the Artery Studios award for excellence in demonstrative evidence.

The interactive presentation can be viewed below:

You must have Flash to view this file